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 Campus Visits should start and end at the Admissions Office. PERIOD!


  Whether you are on campus for a formal Open House, have arranged     for a student-led tour and/or Admission Overview Session, are             attending a Department Overview, have a scheduled interview, are     meeting with an athletic coach, or decided to drop by because you       saw a sign for the school on your way elsewhere, checking in with         Admissions personnel is the ONLY way to guarantee that your name,    and therefore, your interest in the school has been noted. This is   called demonstrated interest and it's actually important, regardless

 of whether or not the school says it is.


  While it is neither necessary, nor practical to visit every college, I       do recommend visiting at least 1/3 of those on your initial list,             paying particular attention to those things that set each school             apart from one another. In all honesty, once you've walked a couple     of campuses and sat through a handful of overviews, everything           starts to blend together.  For this reason, it's always a good idea to       take any materials or handouts that are made available to you and

  to write up a PROS and CONS list for each school either while you're     touring or immediately after your visit while your memories and           impressions are intact.



goCAMPUSing


  The following is my list of DOs and DON'Ts while on campus:

  DON'T wear cut-off shirts, ripped jeans, holey shoes, too-tight             clothing, and the like. Whether you're interviewing or not, you

  should dress to impress.

  DO wear informal, seasonally appropriate casual clothes. Even if 

  you are interviewing or meeting with a coach or department head,       you don't need to be in a suit or jacket and tie, especially if it's 100     degrees and you're also taking a walking tour of campus.

  DON'T show up not knowing why this school is of interest to you. If      your parent(s) or a counselor added this particular school to your         college list, you had better have done your own research by closely     looking at its website before showing up for a tour/visit.

  DO come prepared to ask questions ... of the students. Ask your           student tour guides (and random students you see in the library,

  the cafeteria, walking to classes) where they hail from; what other      colleges they applied to; why they chose the school that they're           at; what their majors are; what their favorite experience to-date         is; whether or not they've lived on campus; what, if anything, they       would change about their school.

  DON'T hide in the back of the pack while out on tour. The farther         you stand away from your tour guide, the less you'll hear what s/he     has to say. 

 DO take notes of the things you see and hear while on tour, including   things that may seem trivial at the time, like the predominant style     of architecture throughout campus, or the number and location of   on-campus eateries, the size of the dorm rooms and whether   they're air conditioned, popular traditions, transportation options   both on and off campus, the cost of a washer and dryer, whether or   not there's a printing limit and the cost and accessibility of printing,   etc.

  DON'T shy away from an opportunity to interview or meet one-on-       one with a school representative, coach or administrator who can

  be an advocate for you.

  DO bring a copy of your resume with you and have a few questions

  to ask about the school's academic programs, such as what are

  the most popular majors, how many students have access

  to internships and/or co-op experiences, how active is the

  school's alumni network?